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Linux what you need to know before adopting the operating system

Have you decided that you want to use functional Linux? You will be happy to join of a community of people appreciated by the open source software. But before you change functional, you need to realize a few details, and change some of your habits.

I do not think Linux is more difficult to use than Windows, but you need to unblock some of your behaviors to adopt new ones.

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Below I describe 5 from the details I mentioned above that I think it would be good to know from the beginning.
Linux

Do not install Linux on a new computer

If you have a new Windows or MacOS computer, you might want to wait one or two years before trying to install Linx. Installing Linux on very new hardware will present more problems than good, and probably not worth it.

Most computer manufacturers do not check to see if Linux is running on their machines. They do not sell Linux computers, which means they do not provide drivers for features that do not support the Linux kernel.

In some cases, you can't install Linux at all, while in others, you may be able to install Linux but you'll soon find out that your Wi-Fi or sound card is not working.

To be more confident, install Linux on your older PC. Check your hardware list and look at the distribution support tables you are interested in. If you definitely want a new Linux computer, buy one that comes with the pre-installed open operating system. You probably will not find such systems in your neighborhood stores, but there are many choices on the internet.

Avoid software from external sources

In Windows, you typically download from the developer's page the application you want to install. For the most part, Linux does not work this way.

Users of the application download and install applications in the Linux application store. Each distribution also has a store or package manager full of free software that you can use.Linux

If at some point the application you are looking for is only available from an external source, there are guides to explain the process.

Installing software from external sources can lead to future problems. Sometimes an application requires a different version of a system component, and unfortunately, other programs on your machine may not yet be ready or compatible, leading to malfunctions. So you'll be wondering why Linux is so buggy and you'll start blaming the operating system.
You keep the software from external sources very limited to your system and try to stay in the software provided by the same distribution.

Use software specifically designed for Linux

If you come from Windows, you should forget about them applications you were using. When you first change to Linx, you may want to stick to what you know. Unfortunately, companies often use fewer resources to develop a software version running Linux. Skype, for example, until recently provided a client for Linx that was far behind the Windows version.

Many would say that Google Chrome is the best browser available on Linux, but that doesn't mean it will work with other applications or even Linux itself as well. THE Mozilla Firefox is a free open source browser and most Linx distributions seem to have been adopted for it, because it is more compatible with the concept and principles of open source software.

VLC is a great and recognized application on Linux and elsewhere. Many free tools started from the Linux platform before moving to others like GIMP and Pidgin. The software available only at Linx is not necessary and good. But software built for Linux is likely to offer a much better experience than applications developed by developers who see Linux as a secondary platform.

Open to new experiences

Many Linux applications are not the same as those you would encounter on Windows or MacOS. They can perform similar functions, but approach each project in a different way. If you want a program that works just like you did on Windows, you'll probably be disappointed and your expectation will prevent you from trying everything Linux has to offer.

The GNOME interface is a good example. It does not look like the Windows interface, and if you do not allow yourself to try new things, you will definitely miss an amazing experience. KDE software may seem complex at first, but if you look for the settings, you can customize it as you want it to. Linux is not an operating system that limits you, but you have to devote time to exploring it.

What you see this will get

In commercial software, development is funded, while free software usually does not have as much money behind each project. Developers may not spend so much time on development, or they can continue to grow in their free time without any commitment. So the apps available from Linx distributions can remain for years without any information.

This means the app you just discovered for the first time will not change in the near future. This is great if you like the app's appearance, but it's not that good if you get an error.

This situation is not the result of only scarce economic resources. The Linx ecosystem is relatively more democratic than other computationally functional. Development teams should agree to take things a new direction, and as the code is open, developers and users who are not satisfied with a change usually choose to keep things as they are.

This does not mean that Linxx's software does not change. The GNOME interface is constantly changing and very different from what it was ten years ago. However, if you expect to complete the redesign of GIMP, Inkscape, or AbiWord applications, you will probably expect a lot.

Do you use Linux?

Personally yes, I have been using it for years. I only use applications for the open operating system and I like to know that I can only install what I need from GNOME. The tools I use are consistent and reliable as ever, and when I want to try something different, I always find something new. If some work is required with applications that are not running on Linux, I also have a Windows computer, but the main operating I use is Linx.

Are you a new Linux user? What surprises have you met? Do you use years, what are the things you learned and would like to know before you first start?

  1. I use it from the end of 2005. I started with opensuse 10.2 KDE and so far I have experimented with lots of distributions. The last 4-5 years have settled on Xubuntu.
    You George what distribution are you using now?

    • i use different, the central is Arch and because I have multiboot I use manjaro for the bios screen system selection. Manjaro automatically starts the system you used before reboot. On various computers I have Centos, Debian, MX. Generally I avoid ubuntoids

      • I had tried Arch a long time ago when he still had that text-based installer but didn't like his PMS. Centos has ancient but stable packages, good for servers. Fedora is generally ok, it looks more upstream than debian, very clean and organized, but it spoils me dnf which is still slow since yum, that is always. Debian is also fine just the reason I prefer ubuntu is because it has easier installation, more user-friendly customized xfce by default (xubuntu-session), especially having ready indicators support and more pleasant theme, also more up-to- date and you are sure that the ppa packages will play.
        That's how I generally ended up with this distribution 😉

        • Still does not have the installer the Arch, but I prefer it because I do the system as I want it, without bloats. Also with this particular operating system, I have every new release of applications, capabilities, and de, immediately after they are released. This of course is not good for everyone, but I need it for reviews.
          For Debian stability, I stay away from major developers such as Opensuse and Canonical.
          For desktop environments, cinnamon, xfce and kde

  2. I use it from the end of 2005. I started with opensuse 10.2 KDE and so far I have experimented with lots of distributions. The last 4-5 years have settled on Xubuntu.

    You George what distribution are you using now?

    • i use different, the central is Arch and because I have multiboot I use manjaro for the bios screen system selection. Manjaro automatically starts the system you used before reboot. On various computers I have Centos, Debian, MX. Generally I avoid ubuntoids

      • I had tried Arch a long time ago when he still had that text-based installer but didn't like his PMS. Centos has ancient but stable packages, good for servers. Fedora is generally ok, it looks more upstream than debian, very clean and organized, but it spoils me dnf which is still slow since yum, that is always. Debian is also fine just the reason I prefer ubuntu is because it has easier installation, more user-friendly customized xfce by default (xubuntu-session), especially having ready indicators support and more pleasant theme, also more up-to- date and you are sure that the ppa packages will play.

        That's how I generally ended up with this distribution 😉

        • Still does not have the installer the Arch, but I prefer it because I do the system as I want it, without bloats. Also with this particular operating system, I have every new release of applications, capabilities, and de, immediately after they are released. This of course is not good for everyone, but I need it for reviews.
          For Debian stability, I stay away from major developers such as Opensuse and Canonical.
          For desktop environments, cinnamon, xfce and kde

  3. Personally, I've been to Debian for years.
    My path was Ubuntu (Debian alpha) -> Mint (Debian beta) -> Debian.
    Now lately I'm worried about the adoption of systemd (which violates one of the most fundamental principles of Unix) and I do not want it.
    I'm waiting for the new stable version of Devuan (ASCII) to try and see it.
    Waiting for I run out of Jessie (oldstable), because the stable is fine.
    Question:
    You mean, in Arch you can choose an alternative startup or the systemd is one way?

  4. Personally, I've been to Debian for years.
    My path was Ubuntu (Debian alpha) -> Mint (Debian beta) -> Debian.

    Now lately I'm worried about the adoption of systemd (which violates one of the most fundamental principles of Unix) and I do not want it.
    I'm waiting for the new stable version of Devuan (ASCII) to try and see it.
    Waiting for I run out of Jessie (oldstable), because the stable is fine.

    Question:
    You mean, in Arch you can choose an alternative startup or the systemd is one way?

  5. I've been using Debian since version 3.0 and have since had multi-boot with windblows for games…
    I've spent windblows for years and only Debian on hard. Version stable with physical extras repositories so I do not need anything from testing, and unstable.
    You take a look at the rutracker and you're ready.

  6. I've been using Debian since version 3.0 and have since had multi-boot with windblows for games…
    I've spent windblows for years and only Debian on hard. Version stable with physical extras repositories so I do not need anything from testing, and unstable.
    You take a look at the rutracker and you're ready.

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